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Influenza Vaccination

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Influenza Vaccination

Post Number:#1  Postby zaieyra » Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:51 am

Hi everyone...
i would like to ask for opinions..i'm going for my first dive trip next week and would like to know..if there's any effect if i take influenza jab today.

the thing is, i took this jab every year for the past 3 yrs..and i'm always sick after bout 1 month plus after the jab..and it's very bad!! none stop running nose, fever and cough for more than a week.

maybe i dont understand why i need to take influenze jab tooo...
too little knowledge about this.. :crybaby2: :crybaby2:

help me.... plizz...plizz...

thanks.
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Re: Influenza Vaccination

Post Number:#2  Postby bijan » Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:02 am

hmm..u get sick 1 month after the jab? and ur trip is next week? meaning u wont be sick next week?

well, if u are to have running nose non stop..big no no to dive..make it hard/impossible to equalise your ears
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Re: Influenza Vaccination

Post Number:#3  Postby LaraCroft » Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:14 am

bijan wrote:hmm..u get sick 1 month after the jab? and ur trip is next week? meaning u wont be sick next week?

well, if u are to have running nose non stop..big no no to dive..make it hard/impossible to equalise your ears


I agree with bijan, trust me when you have running nose or if you JUST recovered from flu, it is difficult to equalise and sometimes you cant equalise at all during the whole dive.

I went thru a very very painful experience going down and unable to equalise. I ended up diving at 6mtrs, only to see such a beautiful view of excellent visability when my friends are all having fun down there discovering so many underwater creatures. :crybaby2: :crybaby2: :crybaby2:
Last edited by LaraCroft on Thu Apr 24, 2008 10:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Influenza Vaccination

Post Number:#4  Postby DiveWhore » Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:08 am

Some key facts about flu vaccines:

There are two types of vaccines:

The "flu shot"— an inactivated vaccine (containing killed virus) that is given with a needle, usually in the arm. The flu shot is approved for use in people older than 6 months, including healthy people and people with chronic medical conditions.
The nasal-spray flu vaccine — a vaccine made with live, weakened flu viruses that do not cause the flu (sometimes called LAIV for “live attenuated influenza vaccine” or FluMist®). LAIV (FluMist®) is approved for use in healthy* people 2-49 years of age† who are not pregnant.
Each vaccine contains three influenza viruses-one A (H3N2) virus, one A (H1N1) virus, and one B virus. The viruses in the vaccine change each year based on international surveillance and scientists' estimations about which types and strains of viruses will circulate in a given year.

About 2 weeks after vaccination, antibodies that provide protection against influenza virus infection develop in the body.

When to Get Vaccinated
October or November is the best time to get vaccinated, but you can still get vaccinated in December and later. Flu season can begin as early as October and last as late as May.

Who Should Get Vaccinated

In general, anyone who wants to reduce their chances of getting the flu can get vaccinated. However, it is recommended by ACIP that certain people should get vaccinated each year. They are either people who are at high risk of having serious flu complications or people who live with or care for those at high risk for serious complications. During flu seasons when vaccine supplies are limited or delayed, ACIP makes recommendations regarding priority groups for vaccination.

People who should get vaccinated each year are:

People at high risk for complications from the flu, including:
Children aged 6 months until their 5th birthday,
Pregnant women,
People 50 years of age and older, and
People of any age with certain chronic medical conditions;
People who live in nursing homes and other long term care facilities.
People who live with or care for those at high risk for complications from flu, including:
Household contacts of persons at high risk for complications from the flu (see above)
Household contacts and out of home caregivers of children less than 6 months of age (these children are too young to be vaccinated)
Healthcare workers.
Use of the Nasal Spray Flu Vaccine
It should be noted that vaccination with the nasal-spray flu vaccine is always an option for healthy* people 2-49 years of age† who are not pregnant.

Who Should Not Be Vaccinated
There are some people who should not be vaccinated without first consulting a physician. These include

People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs.
People who have had a severe reaction to an influenza vaccination in the past.
People who developed Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) within 6 weeks of getting an influenza vaccine previously.
Influenza vaccine is not approved for use in children less than 6 months of age.
People who have a moderate or severe illness with a fever should wait to get vaccinated until their symptoms lessen.
Vaccine Effectiveness
The ability of flu vaccine to protect a person depends on the age and health status of the person getting the vaccine, and the similarity or "match" between the virus strains in the vaccine and those in circulation. Testing has shown that both the flu shot and the nasal-spray vaccine are effective at preventing the flu.

Vaccine Side Effects (What to Expect)
Different side effects can be associated with the flu shot and LAIV.

The flu shot: The viruses in the flu shot are killed (inactivated), so you cannot get the flu from a flu shot. Some minor side effects that could occur are

Soreness, redness, or swelling where the shot was given
Fever (low grade)
Aches
If these problems occur, they begin soon after the shot and usually last 1 to 2 days. Almost all people who receive influenza vaccine have no serious problems from it. However, on rare occasions, flu vaccination can cause serious problems, such as severe allergic reactions. As of July 1, 2005, people who think that they have been injured by the flu shot can file a claim for compensation from the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP).

LAIV (FluMist®): The viruses in the nasal-spray vaccine are weakened and do not cause severe symptoms often associated with influenza illness. (In clinical studies, transmission of vaccine viruses to close contacts has occurred only rarely.)

In children, side effects from LAIV (FluMist®) can include

runny nose
wheezing
headache
vomiting
muscle aches
fever
In adults, side effects from LAIV (FluMist®) can include

runny nose
headache
sore throat
cough
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